Webinar Training for Using the Healthy Food Pantry Assessment Tool (HFPAT)

Webinar Training for Using the Healthy Food Pantry Assessment Tool (HFPAT)


ALEXANDRA
BUSH-KAUFMAN: Alrighty. So thank you for
joining us today. We’re happy to be able to
share this training with you about the Healthy Food
Pantry Assessment Tool. And I want to
recognize that I know that the term “food pantry” is
slightly different than what is used in Washington state. And when we say
food pantry, we’re talking about a direct service
organization, a food assistance setting that gives food
directly to clients. And that might also be
one that has a food bank role in that you might
have satellite-type sites or a mobile pantry or
mobile food bank that is in a parking lot of a church
or a school or a community center. So just for purposes of being
consistent with the language within the assessment
tool, I’m going to use the word food pantry. And this probably
is most closely aligned with what we think of
as food banks in Washington. And around the country,
they might also use the term food
closet or food shelf so that there are
different types of names that are used to describe an
agency that gives food directly to clients. So this assessment tool
has been in development for about two years. We pilot tested it in 15
pantries in Oregon, California, Nevada, Colorado, and Wyoming
over the summer of 2016. And then, from the fall
of 2016 until this August, we went through a field test
in seven different states. And I will talk a little
bit more about that. And we wanted to learn about
how people were using this tool, how it was working for them in
their different environments, and what were the additional
needs that food bank managers and food pantry
managers had in making this tool better for them to
report changes that were going on within their food
bank and food pantry settings related to
environmental support and positive changes through
collaborative efforts from Extension and also
other SNAP-Ed partners. So we heard when we did the
pilot test that the training would have been nice. We didn’t initially
provide a training. And so we are now providing
a training standard with using the tool to make
the whole process a lot easier and also to serve
to collect feedback. So my contact information and
Marie’s contact information will be at the end
of this recording. And I would
encourage anyone that has additional questions
at the end to please feel free to contact us. And the feedback
will just allow us to keep improving the training
and the resource guide materials that are
associated with the survey. So going forward, I just
want to let you all know that the project, the assessment
tool, the instructions, the resource guide, and
this training is designed and intended for use by food
bank managers like yourselves– and you might be paid, or
you might be all volunteer– and USDA low-income
nutrition program staff, which usually includes
SNAP-Ed and may include EFNEP supervisors, as well. And our grant number
is right there. And I updated these slides
on November 8, which was yesterday. So this recording is
taking place on November 9. OK. So I just want to start off with
a little bit of background just to assure you that we did
as much of our homework as we could in the amount
of time that we had. We started off in
April and May of 2016 with in-depth phone interviews. And we interviewed 42 people
across the Western US– and that included a few people
within Washington state– to learn about what was going
on in the food bank/food pantry setting to make the foods
that are offered by pantries and food banks
healthier but then also to make the
environment healthier and a more supportive,
inclusive place. And we learned
two primary things from that large
sampling of interviews. When it comes to how food
bank managers and food pantry leaders define healthiness, that
has to do with an environment where clients are treated
with dignity and respect in the pantry service and
in the culture for clients and volunteers, and also
that a wide variety of fruits and vegetables are available. And that includes both
fresh, frozen, and canned. And then, we did the pilot
test, like I mentioned. And we didn’t pilot test
it in Washington state, but we did field test
it in Washington state. And so the pilot
testers told us what they liked and
didn’t like, and we were able to clarify
some questions and make it a
little bit clearer. And then, this past
summer, this past 2017, we’ve been doing a field test
to test how outside perspective, like those from Extension, from
SNAP-Ed, and how insiders like food pantry managers and
volunteers who are there day in and day out, how they perceive
the different questions and how they complete
the survey tool. And we did that so
that we could make sure that everyone was coming
to the same conclusion, that the tool was
usable by people from different backgrounds. So today, our
training objectives are for you to gain familiarity
with the Healthy Food Pantry Assessment Tool. We’d like to increase comfort in
choosing response options when you’re looking at
the tool and trying to decide, how do I score this
in my food bank/food pantry setting? And we will have some
examples that we can practice. It would be ideal if, while
you’re viewing this webinar, if you had a copy of
the assessment tool in front of you just
to follow along. It’s not necessary. Some people don’t need it. But you’ll see as we go along
that each question that we talk about is numbered to
make it easier for reference. So I’m Alexandra Bush-Kaufman. And I’m an Extension Coordinator
for the research center that’s sponsoring this webinar. And I work at Washington
State University Extension, and I’m in Pierce County. So I’m actually in the same
office as Linda Mathews. And then, I’d also like
to introduce Marie Walsh. Actually, Marie, you can do
a little bit of introduction for yourself if you’d like. MARIE WALSH: Yeah, sure. So hi, everybody. My name’s Marie, and
I’m a research assistant on this Healthy Food Pantry
Assessment Tool project. I’ve been working
with Alexandra on this for the last year and a half. And I’m looking
forward to walking you all through our tool. ALEXANDRA BUSH-KAUFMAN: Great. And Marie is in Fort
Collins, Colorado. So this is a multi-state effort. OK. So we’re going to begin. The first part of
the assessment tool, which is not a part
of scoring, is just information about the
food pantry or food bank, including the date of the
visit, the rater name– which would be you, the person
conducting the assessment– the name of the agency,
and then the address. And if you’re looking at a
mobile food bank or mobile food pantry that might
be operated out of a trailer or a
distribution site, where it’s just produce that’s
been delivered for that day, you would write the
address of the home location of that pantry
or the mailing address. And then, we also ask
to collect information that describes the size
of the pantry by how many pounds of food that
are distributed last month or the number of clients
that were served. And your food bank
or food pantry might not count poundage. You might just count
families that were served or number of meals provided. So however you count
food provision, that is what you would
include in that space there. And then, if it’s a
mobile or school pantry, you can select that. And if neither applies,
then you would check no. OK. So I’m going to get started
on section A, location and entrance. And these questions are
aimed at the accessibility of the pantry. Is it walkable? Is it busable? Is it accessible by all persons? Is it welcoming? And do people know where it is? So question 1– this one, we are
using the walkability checklist from the Federal
Highway Administration. And we selected this
because we thought that it was a really great
subjective assessment of how comfortable people felt
approaching the pantry and how fast cars drive
by, are there sidewalks or other types of barriers. And for completing this, you
would use your best judgment in filling it out. And this is the only
score that is subtracted from the total assessment. And we did that so that
the final score would be on a scale of 0 to 100. OK. So number 2– is there a
bus line within one street block of the pantry? So here is the location of
our office, WSU Extension, Pierce County. And the smaller circle
represents a bus stop. And actually, you can see on
this screenshot of Google Maps that there are two
bus stops here. But if I was going to
walk out of the office, how far do I have to walk
to get to a bus stop? And the bus stop
that I have circled is actually the
preferable bus stop. Because the bus stop
that is farther down Pacific Avenue is the site
of construction right now. They’re dismantling
a large hospital, and it’s not really a great
place to wait for the bus. So you would select
yes or no, depending on how far you have
to go for the bus and if you would consider
that one street block. And the size of a block
might differ, so use your best judgment. Number 3– is the pantry
accessible by persons of all abilities? So you would select
no if someone with limited abilities– maybe has difficulty
walking or must use a walker or another
assisted device– would not be able to navigate
into and out of the pantry. You would select yes, limited
access, or alternative entry if there is an accessible
entrance for everyone, but it’s different from
the main entrance, which might be if the accessible
entrance is around the corner or around the back. And you would select yes,
fully accessible main entrance and exit if the accessible
entrance and the main entrance are the same. And that would include a
smooth surface and the ramp and also if your pantry
has a parking lot– accessible parking. OK. Number 4– does the
agency where the pantry is located either have its own
parking lot or share a lot? So we want to know is
the pantry drivable? If clients are coming
up to the agency, can they get there
and use their car, or do they have to
park down the street? So you would select no if their
only option is using street parking or if
parking is off-site and it’s further
than one block away, or if the pantry only has
one parking spot, so it’s a first come, first
served, which is tricky if you have people
accessing the pantry by car and you’ve got more than
one client coming in. And you would
select yes if you’ve got a lot of parking spaces– two or more– or if you share
a lot with another agency. OK. Number 5– are the
windows of the pantry free of bars or barriers? And this would
include the building where the pantry is located. So if it’s a school
pantry, you’re not only looking at the
pantry or the food bank at the school but the
school itself, for example. And this is getting at
the concept of welcoming. Is the pantry welcoming? And even though bars or
barriers might be necessary, there is some public
health research that shows that it
can discourage people from approaching a store, like
a corner store or a pantry or something like that,
because it feels less friendly. OK. Number 6– is there signage
indicating the pantry’s location from the nearest road? So is the pantry visible? Do people who are driving
by on the street know that there is a food
bank at that agency or that that building is,
in fact, itself a food bank? So you would select
yes if there’s a sign that’s visible from
at least across the street. And in these two
pictures here, I am standing across the street. And in the second picture,
I’ve zoomed in with the camera. But the food bank
sign is readable as you drive by in a car. And you would
select no if there’s no visible sign identifying
the pantry or the sign can’t be read from across the
street because it’s too small. OK. Number 7– on which days
of the month is the pantry open to serve clients? In the calendar below, put an
X for each day of the month the pantry is open. The question is not scored. So this is looking
at open hours. And in the assessment tool,
you’ll see a table like this. And you can make a
check mark or a large X through the appropriate days. In this example, this pantry
is open every Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday and on the
first and third Saturdays of the month. So you might fill
it out like this. Number 8– what hours is the
pantry open to serve clients on the days selected above? Please describe
if these hours are different for different
client populations, like seniors,
refugees, et cetera. This question is not scored. Excuse me. So for example, this pantry
is open Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from
10:00 AM to 3:00 PM and then on Saturdays
for 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM. And maybe you would include
additional information, like on the first Saturday
of the month, that’s when we do the CSFP boxes for seniors. So you could provide additional
information, they’re saying, like we do our senior
boxes on the first Saturday of the month. OK. Number 9– what kind
of check-in procedure does the pantry use
for first-time clients? So many pantries
and food banks have different check-in procedures
for first-time or second-time or recurring clients. And we are aware that
some pantries are required to verify clients’
addresses, and no points are deducted for doing that,
particularly if you’re just looking for an address for
the zip code for TEFAP. So if one document is required–
either proof of address or ID– then you would select a two. If some documents
are required, which is both proof of address and
ID, then you would select a one. Because that’s more
than one document. And if multiple
documents are required, then you would
select the zero here. Number 10– what kind
of second procedure does the pantry
use for returning clients or clients on their
second or following visits? It has similar criteria
as the previous question. And if no documents
are required, then you would select a two. So they might already
be in the system. They’ve already
signed in before. You might also call this
a self-declared model. So if someone comes in and
just says, I need some food, I’m having a rough time,
you would select a two. And that applies,
also, to here– one document required, two. If this is a self-declared
model for the first-time client, you would select a
two there, as well. OK. Number 11– does the pantry
have an electronic check-in procedure, yes or no? If yes, please describe. This question is not scored. So this gets at there is a trend
in certain areas of the country to move towards a
more systematic type electronic check-in where
you get a card scanned, or maybe you enter in
a number in a computer, and it just populates with
your client information and allows you to track how
many people are coming in and their demographics
and things like that. This is different
for every agency. And it’s really dependent
upon the capacity, both in terms of electronic
equipment available and also, maybe, funding and
training of volunteers. So that’s why this
question is not scored. But if you do have a
check-in procedure, or if you’re in the process
of implementing one, for terms of assessment
and measurement, it can be great to capture that
so that when you do follow-up assessments, you can show
some progress, like, oh, we were starting that
a few months ago, and now we’ve got it
fully implemented. And we had to do some
training with our volunteers to get to that point, but we’ve
got it up and running now. OK. Number 12– where is the
waiting line for check-in, and is there a
place to sit down? This question refers to the
line to check in, not the line after checking in to
receive food or service. And you don’t count
any lines that form before the pantry opens. So we know that that
can often happen. And if that happens,
in many ways, that’s out of the
pantry’s control. So we’re not
thinking about that. So during the open
hours of the pantry, where do people wait
before they check in? So if there’s an inside waiting
line for check-in with seating, you would select a three. If there’s an inside waiting
line without seating, or if there’s not enough
seating, which can often sometimes be the
case in that there’s so many people that there’s
not enough places to sit, that would be a two. If the waiting line is
outside and there are seats, that could be a one. And then, if the waiting line
for check-in during open hours is only outside, and
there’s no place to sit, that would be a zero. 13– overall, how long
do clients usually wait to receive food
after checking in? So this is the amount of
time after they’ve signed in and said, I’m here to get some
food or receive other services. How long are they waiting
between that time and then the time that they are packing
up their food to go home? And this might be something that
an outside rater, like someone from SNAP-Ed or
EFNEP, might need to verify with the pantry
or the food bank manager during the time
of the assessment, whether or not the wait time
that’s going on that day is typical. Because seasons change. And then, also, the
time of the month can sometimes affect
how many people show up. So selecting the answer
that best represents the typical wait
time is what you want to do for this question. OK. And so then, here is how you
would calculate the score– the subtotal– for
location and entrance. Numbers 2 through 6 and
numbers 9, 10, 12, and 13 are added together. And you just want to make sure
that the walkability score from number 1 is subtracted. OK. So at this point in
time, we’ll take a break. I will unmute everybody to see
if there are any questions. Chat box. AUDIENCE: [INAUDIBLE]. ALEXANDRA BUSH-KAUFMAN: OK. So I will go ahead and
mute everybody again. So please unmute yourself
or type in the chat box if you have a question. And I’m just going to
keep moving forward. And so section B is the largest
section of the assessment tool. This is where most of the
points within the assessment are awarded. And this is because the ultimate
goal of moving towards a more healthier food pantry,
or a healthier food bank, is to improve the variety
and the quality of fruits and vegetables– both fresh
fruits and vegetables, frozen fruits and
vegetables, and canned fruits and vegetables– and that clients are able to
choose their foods themselves. And also, low-fat
protein and low-fat dairy are also prioritized in
the Food Availability to Clients section. So looking at food
distribution, number 14– does the pantry have
access to a garden, farm, or farmer’s market that provides
fresh produce to the pantry? So you would select yes if
the agency itself, or the food bank itself, has a program
where they receive food from a local farm, a farmer’s
market, or a community garden. And that would also include
if the agency itself has its own garden or its own
dedicated space where maybe it’s part of the larger agency
if it’s a pantry in a church or in a school. If there’s a school
garden and they get produce at the pantry
from the school garden, you would select a yes here. And you would select a no if
the only source of fresh fruits and vegetables is from
the food bank distributor or that it was rescued
from a grocery store. OK. So this is looking at
having multiple sources of fresh fruits and vegetables
to ensure that there is more regular access to those. OK. Number 15– what kind of food
distribution does the pantry use to send food
home with clients? Select one. Client choice means that the
clients remove items directly from the shelf themselves like
they were shopping in a grocery store. So there are four different
choices here, and each of them receives a point. If one, two, or
three are selected, you skip to number 19. And that is because questions
16, 17, and 18 are about food marketing principles. And in order for those
marketing principles to really be effective
with consumers, the individual has to actually
be able to select the food off of the shelf themselves and put
it in their bag or their box or their cart. And that’s because there is
a lot more decision-making and influence that happens when
a person is making that choice and why those food marketing
ideas work with them there. So client choice only is clients
choose and remove all foods from the shelf themselves
without assistance. So they might be matched
up with a volunteer, but the client
themselves is actually the one that’s taking the
food off of the shelf or out of the bin or selecting it. Number three would
be chosen if clients choose but volunteers remove. And that might look like
if they were matched up with a personal
shopper, and they’re going through the line
or the different aisles, and the client points
to what they want, but they’re not actually
allowed to touch the food. And then, the
volunteer is the one who’s responsible for
selecting which cans or which loaf of bread that
the client gets to take. That might also
look like if there is a list of foods that
are available that day, and clients can
choose from the list. But a volunteer is
the one who ultimately pulls that off the
shelf and then packs it into a bag for the client. Number two– a mix
of prepacked boxes, and volunteers select
food for clients. That would be if clients receive
a prepacked, standardized box that has food in it that they
didn’t select previously. And then, there would be
another section of the food bank or food pantry where the client
could, again, select foods by either pointing to
them or requesting them, and then they would get
added to that box or bag that was standard for everyone,
depending on family size or situation if they’re
receiving, like, a homeless box or a senior box. And then, you would
select number one– prepacked boxes only– if all
clients receive a emergency food box that has been
prepacked by volunteers, and the size of the box and
the amount of food in the box or the weight of the box– maybe by pounds– is determined
by the number of people in the household or, again,
the special situation in that family, like are they
experiencing homelessness, or maybe they have diabetes,
and there’s a diabetes box. But the box is
already made for them when they come to
pick up their food. So this is an example of
two client choice pantries. And here is a shopping
cart and an individual selecting the food
themselves off of the shelf. OK. Number 16– are
fruits and vegetables placed before other foods
in the food pickup line? And fruits and vegetables
includes frozen, fresh, canned, or dried. So in order to select a two,
all of the fruits and vegetables are in the front. Both the frozen, fresh, and the
canned come before other items. You would select a one if half
of the fruits or vegetables are one of the first
things that is chosen. So here, in the second example,
the protein is selected first, and then the vegetables
are chosen from. And that would count as a one. And then, the last example,
the fruits and vegetables– the frozen, canned and the
fresh– are placed at the end. And we know that
sometimes, logistically, it is easier to have the
fruits and vegetables at the end, particularly
the fresh ones. Because that might be
where the distribution is delivered from the
food bank or the garden. And it’s not as easy
to store those things. And so that’s temporary, in
the back of the food receiving area, possibly. However, what we
know about wanting to increase people’s intake at
home of fruits and vegetables is that if they select the
fruits and vegetables first, and then they select the protein
and the grain and the dairy, then they’re more likely to
build meals around those fruits and vegetables. And building a meal around
the fruits and vegetables is more ideal for
a healthy diet. And many of our– many of the people that are
coming to food banks and food pantries are interested
in pursuing a healthy diet and might be told
to because they’re experiencing diabetes or heart
disease or things like that. So that’s why this question is
really looking for individuals to choose fruits
and vegetables first and then protein
and grain and dairy second so that they can build
their meals around the fruits and vegetables. OK. Here’s an example. So hopefully, you may or may
not have located the chat box. If you have, I would ask you to
type your response in the chat box and then select how you
would score this scenario. So here, you start
off by selecting your canned vegetables,
then your canned fruits. And then, you move
to the grain room, where you get to
select some breads. And then you can pull some
protein from this freezer. And then, you walk out the door. And at the end of
the line is where the fruits and vegetables–
the fresh ones– are. So given this scenario, how
would you score this question? And I’ll wait a few seconds
and just grab a drink of water. OK. So I’ve seen about
two responses. So in this question, you would
select a one, as you see here. And that is because the
fresh items are at the end. We know that this is a
common scenario, again, because it’s easier to put fresh
produce at the end of the line. But again, the best practice,
or the healthiest option, would be to have the fresh,
frozen, and canned fruits and vegetables first. OK. Number 17– are
fruits and vegetables placed at eye level or waist
level and easy to reach? So number two– yes, both
easy to see and reach. That would be, as you
see here in this example, similar to produce stands at
a grocery store or farmer’s market where the food is
elevated to waist level and it’s propped
up, making it easier to reach and also sort through
and choose for yourself. It would also be
easier for someone if the food is elevated
and propped or displayed to where they can
reach it for someone with physical limitations
to select those foods. You would select a one if it’s
somewhat easy to see and reach. Maybe the produce
is at waist level, but it’s spread out along a
long table, and it’s crowded, and it’s sort of difficult
to choose and look and see what quality is available. Or maybe if you have to
reach considerably higher than you would think, or if
a very short person wouldn’t be able to see what
was on the top shelf, you could select a one. And then, you
would select a zero if the fruits and vegetables– fresh, frozen, canned–
are a little bit more difficult to see and reach. And that would be
if they were placed six inches above
the ground in bins, and someone might have to
bend over and sort through to see what they
wanted to select. So again, use your
best judgment here. Number 18– are there
signs that highlight the location of
fruits and vegetables within the client choice model? So this includes arrows,
item locator signs, daily availability
lists, et cetera. Even though fruits
and vegetables might be the first thing that’s
in the line at your food bank or food pantry location,
research from food marketing has shown us that
having a locator sign or a big, colorful
sign that says, we have fruits and vegetables
today or, look here, you can see fruits
and vegetables– really grabbing consumers’ and
clients’ attention and showing them, hey, look at this,
pay attention to this, this is important– encourages
them to select those items and take them home and eat them. So putting up these
signs is meant to encourage people to select
fruits and vegetables and also really drive home the
point, like, oh, I’m supposed to build a
meal around these. OK. Number 19– are there
signs that highlight the nutritional benefits of
fruits and vegetables displayed throughout the pantry? So first, in order to
answer this question, you might walk through the
pantry and count the signs. And you’re looking, again,
at fresh, frozen, canned, or dried. This would include the
number of shelf talkers or small signs that are matched
with different kinds of foods that detail some kind
of nutritional benefit. That could include fiber,
vitamins, minerals, high protein. You would select no signs if
there are no signs at all. You would select
one to three signs if there’s no more than
three signs available. And you would like
four or more signs if you count four or
more shelf talkers. And actually,
these examples here come from Pierce
County, Washington, which is where we’re doing
this training right now. So Pierce County
SNAP-Ed is really ahead of the game in delivering
some assistance and materials to food bank partners. So shout out to you guys. Thank you for doing that, and
thank you for these examples. OK. Section B.2 is
specifically looking at fresh fruits and vegetables. So is fresh fruit
available to clients on the day of the pantry visit? If no, then you would
skip to number 23. Because questions 21 and 22
are about the fresh fruit that you’re looking
at on that day. OK. 21– what is the overall variety
of fresh fruit in the pantry on the day of the visit? So your goal– count each
kind of fruit as one type. For example, yellow apples,
red apples, and green apples only count as one type of fruit. So here in this
example below, this counts as four types of fruit. Even though there are
different colors of grapes, or different kinds of grapes
and different kinds of apples, in the end, the
selection, or the variety, is similar to the way
that consumers or clients look at in that apples
can be used similarly. I know in Washington
state, we’ve got a lot of apple varieties. So they might not all be
used exactly the same. But for the purposes
of this type of variety an apple is an apple,
and a grape is a grape. And here, there is a difference
between citrus fruits in that the small
oranges, or Clementines, are different from
limes, for example. And again, just use
your best judgment when you’re estimating variety. Number 22– what is
the overall quality of fresh fruit in the pantry
on the day of the visit? Choose the best answer that
represents the overall quality. So you’re looking at the quality
of the fresh fruit that’s available. You’re looking for wilting,
decay, shriveling, brownness or dryness, and
also color changes, which can indicate age. So if you have some
difficulty selecting choice based on only one kind of fruit,
just scan all of the fruits available and make
your best judgment. If 50% or more is
good, then you would choose medium or high quality. If it’s all good quality,
then you select four. If it’s more good than
not, but not all good, then you can select three. And if that day, it’s not that
great– maybe it’s winter time, as we’re coming up here– then you would select a two. And if it’s poor
quality and you just don’t feel good about the
fresh fruit on that day, then you can select a zero. So here’s some examples
of wilting and decay in cauliflower and red lettuce. And so it might be a
little bit hard to tell, but in the decay of the
lettuce, it gets kind of slimy. Shriveledness, again,
is a demonstration of age in a produce. The peppers on the right,
down at the bottom, are more shriveled, so they’ve
lost some of that water. And that means
that they’re older, and they don’t
look as attractive. And because of that, they
are less likely to be chosen and then less likely to
be taken home and eaten. Stem cuts that are
brown and dry– it’s a little bit hard
to tell in the example of the asparagus– but again,
the dryness is a sign of age. And then here, in this
broccoli, the color change is also a sign of age and decay. And freshness is associated
with more nutrient content. And so in this broccoli example,
here, the broccoli on the left is a darker green color. And that means it’s younger,
or it was picked more recently, than the broccoli on the right. And also, the nutrient content
is a little bit higher. So as the broccoli ages, some of
those nutrients do break down, and that leads to
the color change. And again, you can pull
out some bagged items, looking at fresh produce. The higher quality
on the left, there’s more water in those carrots. And then on the
right– those carrots on the right, the poor quality–
they’re a little bit drier. And sometimes eating–
like in this example, carrots– eating a dry
carrot might actually be a little bit dangerous. Because you’re more
likely to choke on it. I don’t know if anybody has
had the experience of choking on a dry carrot
they’re trying to eat. But it’s happened
to me once or twice. And so again, the higher
the quality, the more water content that that fruit or
vegetable has, the more likely it is to be selected and eaten
and the healthier that it usually is. Because it’s got
more nutrients in it. OK. So number 23– are
fresh vegetables available to clients on the
day of the pantry visit? If no, then you skip to 26. And 24 and 25 assess the overall
variety of fresh vegetables and overall quality
of fresh vegetables in a way that is very
similar to fresh fruits. And in the example
here for 24, you are going to count each
vegetable as one type. For example, Romaine
lettuce, iceberg lettuce, and butter lettuce would only
count as one type of vegetable. OK. So here, I’m going to
pause for questions. And I did see that there is
a question for number 13. If the time changes within
the time of day from over 30 to less than 10– and I believe
that that’s the question about the amount of time. So I’m just going to go back. OK. So that happens, depending
on the time of day. And I would say choose
the response that represents the
average, or choose the response of when most of
your clients are coming in. How long are they
usually waiting? And there are different
interventions and strategies that you might undertake
with food bank leadership to try to decrease wait time. And it definitely is an
ongoing conversation. And it can depend on the time
of the year and also the season, so using your best judgment. When most clients are
coming in, how long are they waiting, on average? OK. And I see another question. Does there have to
be enough variety to serve everyone all day? Again, really
important question. Because variety does change
as the time of day goes on. So when you’re first
entering, when you first open the pantry
or the food bank, you might have a lot of variety. And then, at the end of
your distribution hours, things are a little
bit picked over. So I would say that when
you are assessing variety, do it for what you
see at that time. So you’re going to,
probably, get a higher score if you assess variety
before the pantry opens or when the pantry
or the food bank has just opened
to serve clients. And maybe you’re going
through your agency. The doors have opened. People are starting to check in. And this is when you
go through, and you’re doing your assessment. And you’re looking at
when my clients come in, as they’re following me now,
what are they going to see? And that’s really part
of the assessment process is you’re really looking
at when people are coming through my food bank, how
do they feel about the way that they’re being treated
and also what variety are they seeing? What quality are they seeing? So doing the assessment at the
beginning of distribution hours on the day that your
distribution is occurring will give you the best
score that really represents what the client experiences. If you’re doing the
assessment on a day that the pantry or the
food bank is closed, you’re probably not going to get
an accurate measure as to what a client is experiencing. Because that’s not a day
that they would be coming in. And maybe the variety is lower
because your volunteers are out doing the rounds, and picking
up the produce or the canned or the other donations. So that really, I think, gets
to the type of question as to when should you
do the assessment? I would say do the
assessment on a day that the pantry is
open to serve clients. And do the assessment
at the beginning of distribution hours. If you specifically are
interested in knowing about what variety you have at
the end of distribution hours, then you could do the
assessment then, as well. And you might do it twice. You might say, OK, I want
to know what kind of variety I have at the beginning
of distribution, and I want to know what kind
of variety I have at the end. And you can sort
of measure that. But it probably doesn’t
surprise anybody that your variety
is going to go down at the end of distribution
hours because that stuff will be picked through. And then, as far as does there
have to be enough variety to serve everyone all day,
that’s really up to you and what your goals are in
your service to clients. This question and the question
about variety and vegetables is just meant to
give you a score that reflects how much variety
there is and whether or not there is enough. And whether or not
that meets your goals is up to your organization. Thank you for that question. OK. I’m going to move on
to question number 26. So this question is not scored. And this is just asking if
the pantry has frozen storage. Because the following questions
are about frozen fruits and vegetables and protein. So if there’s no
frozen storage, you don’t have to answer
that question. There might be some instances
when frozen storage is located off-site. And let’s say there are
two churches that operate a single pantry together. And one church has the pantry
and the distribution space, but the other church
or synagogue or mosque or what have you,
has the freezers. That’s what they’ve used
their extra space for. They’ve put all
their freezers there. So you could answer
yes in that case. Because at the secondary
location where the distribution occurs, you’re still able
to offer frozen items, maybe in a cooler that are moved over
from the primary frozen storage area to the area
where it’s given out. OK. So 27. We are looking at variety of
frozen fruit and vegetables in the pantry on the
day of the visit. So again, when
you’re counting type, mixed frozen foods
or mixed vegetables or mixed fruit
that’s frozen would count as one type of
fruit or vegetable. So if there are two
bags of mixed vegetables and one bag contains
peas and carrots while the other contains
peas, carrots, corn, onions, both of those would count as
one type of frozen vegetable, and that would be
mixed frozen vegetable. For this question, we are
not interested in counting the variety of other items
that would be less healthy or that might be in more
abundance in clients’ diets. Because we’re looking
to encourage the option to select fruits,
vegetables, low-fat protein, and low-fat dairy. So for variety, you do
not count mixed dishes like lasagnas, pastas, noodle
dishes, pies, pot pies, TV trays, breaded meat
products, frozen potatoes, or snack products. So here’s an example of how
you would count frozen fruits and vegetables. So on the left, we’ve got
Marie Callender’s pot pie and a Healthy Choice
chicken Alfredo. So you would not count
that towards your scoring of variety. And on the right
here, this would count as three types
of frozen vegetables. Because the two bags
of mixed vegetables at the top count as one type. OK. 20– what is the overall
quality of frozen fruit and vegetables in the pantry
on the day of the visit? If there is little to no
frost visible on any fruits or vegetables, you
would select a two. If there’s some frost visible,
you would select a one. And if the bag of frozen
fruits and vegetables is kind of frozen
solid, or you wouldn’t feel comfortable about eating
it, that would be a zero. And the zero would
be also selected if you were concerned
that the bag had been thawed and then refrozen. And that’s when
you get bags that have been sort of molded
to fit their containers when they’re kind of in a
block form, which happens in my freezer sometimes. And that’s just a
food safety concern. And then here, in this
example of strawberries, I would score that as a one. There is frost on
the strawberry. So when it’s thawed, it might
lose some of its integrity. But it’s nutritious, and it
can be used in a smoothie. And you might ask, well, how
do we assess frozen fruits and vegetables if
the bags are opaque? Like in this example here on the
right, those are opaque bags. And I would say that if
you’re doing this assessment with SNAP-Ed or an EFNEP
program that this might be a great opportunity to
do a food demonstration and say, OK, well,
we’re going to cut open a bag of fruits or vegetables
to do the assessment and look at what is the
quality of the produce that we’re offering. But then say, OK, well,
now, we can do a demo on how to use fruits
or vegetables that have been frozen in soups
or stews or in smoothies. So if you do want to
get an accurate picture, and you’re going to need
to open a bag to do that, then having a plan of
what to do with that bag after you’ve opened it to
make it available to clients. And we do have questions later
on in the assessment that look at food demos and also samples. OK. Lean protein. So we’re using the National
Heart, Lung and Blood Association qualifications
of lean protein, which is two to three grams
of fat per one-ounce serving. And that would count as 12
grams of total fat or less per four-ounce portion. So we’ve already looked at
the general types of foods that this would include. So you can look at the nutrition
facts label and do the math. You can also count as
one type of lean protein for any of the following
that are listed in the bullets, which
includes chicken with the skin removed, turkey– skin removed, the crustaceans
and the different types of fish, also, if it’s
luncheon meat that’s fresh or frozen that is marked
or labeled as low-fat or lean, and if it’s a low-fat nut butter
and a low-fat meat substitute. So we do have a question
about dried protein later on, or dried and canned. And so you could count
peanut butter here, or you could count it later on. It depends on where you feel
comfortable counting it. But for the purpose
of this assessment, peanut butter only counts if
it’s low-fat peanut butter. And again, it’s
really up to you. If you feel very strongly that
you want to count your peanut butter because it’s an important
protein source for your food bank population, then
that’s your judgment call. And the reason that we’re
looking specifically at low-fat peanut
butter is to decrease the saturated fat content
within clients’ diets. Because people that experience
food insecurity or that might use food pantry/food
bank food generally have a lot of other sources of
high-fat foods in their diet. And so decreasing
that fat content is a goal of the
assessment tool. We are aware that
low-fat peanut butter might have more
sugar in it, and then that can also be a problem. Because pantry clients
or food bank clients might also be experiencing some
complications with blood sugar control or diabetes. So that’s why I would say
use your best judgment. So number 29– what
is the overall variety of frozen and fresh lean
protein in the pantry on the day of the visit? So you’re going to count all
frozen or fresh lean protein sources, including
some pantries or food banks might get donations
of fresh protein and then might
immediately freeze it. You would count that. Dairy and eggs are not counted
in this variety question because they’re counted later
on in the assessment tool. So here, these are
pork chops and also chicken breasts with the skin. And the nutrition label is
in a four-ounce portion, and it’s difficult to read. But there are 11 grams
of fat in the pork chop. And then, there are 14 grams
of fat in the frozen chicken. So neither one of
these two pictures here would count towards
frozen protein variety because of their fat content. And that’s not saying
that you shouldn’t have those items at your pantry
or that you shouldn’t give them out. We’re just looking at increasing
the sources and the variety of low-fat protein in
our clients’ diets, just with this assessment tool. OK. So here, I would again ask
you to type in the chat box to apply some of the counting. So for example, number one,
you have frozen turkey breast, we’ll say with the skin
removed, firm, fresh tofu, dried black beans,
and dried red beans. So how many types
of protein would you count that as for number one? And I realize we haven’t
gone over beans yet. But in counting types,
this similar logic applies. OK. So I’ve got one response. So this would count as
three types of protein– one type of frozen, one
type of fresh, for the tofu. And then, the dried
beans would count as one type of dried protein. Because black
beans and red beans would be used
similarly in a recipe or when the client
takes them home. So this would count as
three types for example one. So for example two, you
have a frozen whole turkey. Actually, for low-fat,
the low-fat doesn’t count. So we’re just looking at
types for example two. You have a whole frozen turkey. You have frozen chicken breast. You have packages of sliced
deli turkey, dried red beans, and canned, low-fat
refried beans. How many types of protein
are there in example two? We’ve got turkey, chicken,
sliced deli turkey, beans, and refried beans. So looking at this
example, we’ve got one type of fresh, which
would be the lean turkey– that would be fresh– and two types of frozen– one frozen turkey,
one frozen chicken– and then one type of dried. And this question, the way that
type and variety is counted, you really want to think about
how the client is receiving the food and the way that they
might use it and prepare it. So you’re getting two types of
frozen protein in this case. And then fresh deli turkey,
they could use that immediately in a sandwich. Dried beans would be used
similarly in different recipes. And then the canned beans
would be used on their own. So this counts as five
types because they’re four different
delivery of the food– one fresh, the frozen,
the dried, the can. And then, when you
look at frozen only, you’ve got turkey
and chicken, which, even though they’re
both poultry, they could be used differently. And they have different
nutrient content, particularly if you’re
looking at amino acids and types of protein
and things like that. I’m going to go ahead and
answer a question that I see in the chat box right now. And that is are frozen beans– garbanzo, lentil– counted
separate from dried beans? And I would say for
this assessment, I would count frozen
beans separately. Because they require
different preparation methods. Frozen beans, you might be
able to just microwave them. And then, because they
already have water in them, they might be easier
to use in a recipe. Or they might require a
different preparation method, whereas dried beans, you
might have to rehydrate them, depending on what
you’re using them for. So with protein, particularly
with non-meat sources of protein, you’re
looking at preparation and how easy or difficult
it is to consume that food and then using
your best judgment about how your clients are
going to prepare the stuff. You might be located
in an area where people are really comfortable in using
all different types of beans, depending on the
clients that you serve. Or you might be in
an area, and you might have a client population,
that only feels comfortable using stuff out of cans. And so having a
variety of dried beans isn’t advantageous to you. So again, thinking
about your clients and how they’re
going to use them and how that applies
to the way that you count variety of
those lean options, I think it’s important. And it means that,
unfortunately, there’s not exactly a right way
to answer the question, just that you want to get as
much variety of lean options available to them that
they can select from to increase those sources of
lean protein in their diet. OK. So what is the overall
quality of frozen and fresh lean protein in the pantry
on the day of the visit? You’re going to assess lean
protein that’s fresh or frozen in a similar way. This question here is only
geared towards frozen. Because we heard
in our field test that when pantries and food
banks receive donations of fresh protein,
they often freeze it to extend its shelf life. But if you do have
fresh protein available, use your best judgment
to select what quality that you feel that it has. So when we’re looking at frost,
if there’s little to no frost visible on any of the
lean protein items, you would select a two. If there’s some frost visible,
then you’d select a one. And if your frozen
protein is, again, in that frozen
solid block, which would signify that
it had been thawed and then refrozen
maybe once or twice, that’s a concern
for food safety. And then, you would
select a zero. And so here, in
this food pantry, they’ve got donations
of frozen meat. And I would score those
in the picture as a two. Because they’re vacuum sealed. Even though there’s
a little bit of frost on the outside of the package,
you could just scrape that off. And there’s no frost on the
inside of the package there. OK. B.4– canned and dried
fruits and vegetables and lean protein. So again, keeping in mind that
individuals who experience food insecurity or might
be experiencing situational poverty often
also have some complications of chronic diseases
like obesity, heart disease, and diabetes,
these questions are geared towards reducing
the amount of salt and sugar in their overall diet– not saying that you can’t
offer regular canned vegetables or fruits but really
encouraging a lot more option and having the pantry be a place
where they know that they’re guaranteed to have
access to low-sodium or low-sugar canned fruits as an
ideal way to improve their food equity in their access. That’s what these questions
are getting at here. So question 31– are most of
the canned vegetables labeled as low-sodium or no
salt added in the pantry on the day of the visit? So if you’ve got
all cans labeled as low-sodium or no salt added,
you would select a three. If more than half of
the cans but not all are labeled as low-sodium
or no salt added, you’d select a zero. And then, if you have some– which would be less than
half but more than zero– are low-sodium or no salt
added, you’d select a one. And if on that day
of the visit, you don’t see any low-sodium cans,
then you would select a zero. Number 32– are most
of the canned fruits labeled as low-sugar,
no sugar added, or canned in their own juice? And this question is scored
similarly to question 31. Again, looking to
move towards offering as many low-sugar fruit
options as possible so that if clients that
are using the pantry do have issues with blood sugar
or diabetes or something, that they know that they can
go to the food bank and food pantry and have
the option and be encouraged to choose
a lower-sugar option for their disease. That’s the ideal thing that
we’re looking to encourage. Number 33– what is the
overall variety of dried or canned lean protein
available to clients on the day of the visit? And so if you feel that you have
a wide variety of dried beans, lentils, and low-fat peanut
butter, and also tuna canned in water, you
can select a zero. If you don’t have any
fish canned in water, and you just have
dried beans, lentils, and low-fat peanut butter,
then you select moderate– number two. And then, if you have limited– you just have dried
beans and lentils, no low-fat peanut butter,
no canned fish in water– then you’d select a one. And if you don’t have any
dried beans or other protein options on that day, then
you would select a zero. OK. So we’re going to move on
to low-fat dairy, eggs, and grains. OK. So low-fat dairy items
are milk or soy-based, and they meet all of
the following criteria. They’ve got more
than seven grams of protein per one cup
or eight-ounce serving, less than five grams of total
fat, and, again, 300 milligrams of calcium, or 25% to 30%
of calcium on their label. The protein requirement
for low-fat dairy is what excludes oat milk or
almond milk or coconut milk. Sorry. Now, if you do have
a nut milk that has been fortified
with protein, as long as it has seven grams
of protein or more per eight-ounce serving, I would
say go ahead and count that. That tends to be rare. But grocery rescue
and food commodities, you can get all kinds of things
that end up in your food bank. So to count it as a
low-fat dairy item, you’re looking for five grams
or less of fat per serving and also more than seven grams
of protein and the calcium. So the list here, you
can count these items as low-fat dairy products. It’s not an exclusive list. And we did want you to know that
almond milk and coconut milk are not on the list because
their protein content is usually not high enough. And protein is really important
in the client population. We also know that, depending
on how many families you serve, that regular milk– whole milk or 2% milk–
would be encouraged, particularly for
infants and children, and that we’re not
saying that you shouldn’t offer that product. We just want to know, do you
have low-fat dairy available here? And there is a question later
on in the assessment tool about referrals to WIC. And so, hopefully, the family
could get the regular milk, or the milk that’s better for
children that has that higher fat content, that they
could get that from WIC and then get the other
low-fat milk from the food bank or the food pantry so
that there’s a synergy there between where they’re
getting their dairy sources. So number 34– what
is the overall variety of low-fat dairy items? You’re going to choose variety
based on the criteria above, and we just went over that. And as you can see
here in the table, the variety types is different. And you’re not
going to count items with full fat or low protein
content or low calcium content. And cheese is generally
not considered low-fat. Even if it is labeled
as low-fat cheese, it doesn’t usually have
a low enough fat content to count as a low-fat item. So here, you have two different
packages of dairy milk. And this would count
as one type of milk. Because it’s dairy,
it’s cow’s milk, and it’s in a canned form. And so it would be used
similarly in a recipe. And the variety
scale is different. Because we learned
from our pilot testers that dairy products can be one
of the more difficult things to have on a regular basis in
the pantry setting and the food bank setting. And so the scale was adjusted
to more accurately reflect the true variety within
pantries and the struggle that it can be to get regular
milk, dairy or non-dairy milk, to our clients. OK. Number 35– what kind of
eggs are available to clients on the day of the pantry visit? This includes whole,
fresh, powdered, or fluid packaged eggs. Select the best option that
corresponds to the eggs available. So if you have whole, fresh
eggs or any other type, you select a three. If you have both powdered
and fluid packaged eggs but no whole fresh
eggs, you select a two. If you only have
powdered or dry eggs– no fluid eggs, no fresh eggs– you select a one. And if you don’t have any type
of eggs available on that day, then you select a zero. OK. Number 30– what is the
overall variety of grain items on the day of the pantry visit? Do not count pastries, cookies,
cakes, or sugary grain items. So you’re looking at
both single grains, which would be things like quinoa,
oatmeal, rice, and also refined grains, which would
be your breads, your pastas, your crackers, your bagels. Do not count grain
items with over 10 grams of added sugar
per serving, which would exclude most children’s
cereals and other cereal. Even if they’re labeled as a
healthier or a natural option, there’s a lot of sugar
that comes in cereal form. And if you don’t
have any available, then you can skip to
the end of the section. So this question is not
saying that you’re not allowed to offer birthday cake
or cake mix or raisin muffins or things like that
but that they wouldn’t count towards your
variety of grain, again, just because we want
to encourage more single grain and refined grains that have
lower sugar options to just support people being able
to make a healthier choice and also to be able to
control the amount of sugar in their diets. Because if the only grains that
are available at the food bank are lots of sugar,
then they’re not really able to make a choice and
have agency over how much sugar is in their diet, which might
be a struggle if they’ve got diabetes or if they’ve been
told that they’re pre-diabetic or something. OK. Number 37– of the
grain items that are at the pantry
or the food bank, what is the availability
of whole grain products on the day of the pantry visit? So if over 90% of all
grain products are whole– and you want to check
the labels for this or do a cursory glance at your
grain room or your bread room and you’re like, almost
everything we’ve got here is a whole grain– then you select a three. If more than half
of what’s offered but not almost everything
is a whole grain, then you select a two. If you’ve got some whole grain
options but it’s not half, then you select a one. And if you don’t have any
whole grains available, or all of your grains are white,
then you would select a zero. And so just looking at the
example on the bottom left here, we’ve got some pasta. And of the pasta that is
available in these four different packages, only one
of the packages is whole wheat. So if we only were looking
at the pasta that’s available here, this would score as a one. And that’s a very small,
very specific example. OK. So because section B is so
important and also so long, the scoring for it is on
the same page as section C. So just wanting to point
out that you can carry over your totals from
your different pages. And then you can do your section
B total down at the bottom. OK. So what questions
does everybody have? And I will just keep
everyone muted for now. So please unmute
yourself if you’d like to ask a question,
or type in the chat box. MARIE WALSH: I know Julie
had a question earlier when you were going
through section B if you look in the
chat box, Alexandra. ALEXANDRA BUSH-KAUFMAN: OK. When clients choose
their own food, it significantly slows
down the service times. And if a volunteer hands them,
it can quicken the service. This is definitely true. And so again, I think that this
is getting back to question 15. So that goes to the priorities
of your food bank or pantry. There is only a
one-point difference between “clients choose and
volunteers remove” and “client choice only.” In the following questions– 16, 17, and 18– those are food
marketing questions looking at promoting
the selection of fruits and vegetables. And those marketing
principles don’t apply if people aren’t able
to actually take the food off themselves. Because there is a
psychological interaction that goes into effect if someone else
is taking their food for them and if they’re not
able to choose, which is why you’d skip
those following questions. And then, depending on
the level of training, and also the level
of familiarity that people have
with the client, switching over from a client
choose, volunteers remove selection process to
a client choice only, it might slow down the service
for a certain amount of time. But as people become more
familiar with the service and the amount of time that
they’ve got to go through, you might find that
it speeds up or not. This is an ongoing conversation
between different sizes of food banks, different
types of pantries, throughout the country. And it really just depends
on what your goals are and what your priorities are. And this pantry tool
is meant to reflect the most ideal situation
for individuals to be empowered to make
the healthiest choices for themselves. And when they’re able to
select those foods themselves, they’re much more likely to take
them home and actually consume them. And that’s the ultimate
goal is to get more fruits and vegetables and lean
protein and low-fat dairy into the diets of clients
that access food banks. Yeah. So that’s where this comes from. AUDIENCE: In regards to that,
when I look at question 15, if you answer a three
for self-service, you skip all of those questions. But how we display our
fruits and vegetables is done to where we’d score
a five because it’s all up and it’s a line where
they can see it. But we have the clients
choose the item they want, but the volunteers
take it off the shelf and put it in the bag to limit
handling of the fresh fruits and vegetables. And so how would you score that? ALEXANDRA BUSH-KAUFMAN:
I guess I would say I would leave it up to you. When you’re taking this
tool and you’re using it in your food bank
setting, you don’t have to follow the skip
logic if your priority is to display the foods
and do all of the things that questions 16,
17, and 18 talk about and you want those
points to be captured. But because of the
logistics of your agency, you’re going to choose
a different response option for 15. So I guess I would
turn it back to you, and I would say choose the
best option that corresponds with the goals of
your agency and how you want to measure changing
the [INAUDIBLE] model with your agency and
the kind of conversation you want to have about that. I guess I don’t have
a specific answer. It’s just that this is the way
the survey tool was designed and meant to be filled out. And the questions are
skipped because there is a lot of research and
a lot of evidence that says that marketing efforts
that are captured in 17 and 18 change when people take
this food themselves, even if they are
handling it more. It just changes
because people feel a certain amount of judgment. And that changes the way that
they make choices and the way that they’re affected
by marketing. OK. I see that there’s a
new message on the– OK, thank you. OK. Yeah. So I’m going to go
to section C. And I’m going to turn it over to Marie. MARIE WALSH: All right. Thank you, Alexandra. Can everybody hear me OK? I am on my laptop audio. Can you hear me OK, Alexandra? ALEXANDRA BUSH-KAUFMAN: Yes. I can hear you. And I’m going to go ahead
and [? mute ?] myself now. MARIE WALSH: OK. Great. So section C, on policies
of the food pantry, has six yes or no questions. And they ask about
documented written policies in place in the food pantry. So for these questions, you
would not include policies that are spoken only, just the
ones that are documented, so that if there’s a change
in the pantry leadership– maybe suddenly or unexpectedly– the policies would
be set in stone and continue to be
enforced, ideally. Next slide, please. OK. 38– does the pantry
have documented nutritional guidelines for
food brought into the pantry? And there are some examples of
procurement policies listed. So things like not accepting
donations of soda or candy or policies where the pantry
only purchases low-sodium options– anything along
those lines that’s addressing the food that’s
being brought into the pantry. Policies on not accepting
spoiled or expired foods do not count in this question. Also, again, don’t
count policies that are spoken only
and not written. Next slide, please. OK. 39– does the pantry
have documented nutritional guidelines for
food given out by the pantry to the clients? So this question is very
similar to the last one except it’s asking
about food given out. So there are some
examples, so policies like making sure
clients are provided with food that reflects
the MyPlate guidelines or not distributing
candy to clients. And like the previous
question, don’t count policies on not sending spoiled
or expired foods out to clients or policies
that aren’t documented. Next slide, please. Question 40– does
the agency and/or the pantry have a
document [AUDIO OUT] with respect and
dignity policy for how clients and volunteers are
treated and expected to act? Examples include a written
policy covering client behavior in the pantry or a
non-discrimination policy. So this question is
about policies addressing the emotional
environment in the pantry and the emotional environment,
including respect and dignity of clients and
volunteers, is a theme throughout this whole toolkit. And this question, number
40, is asking whether or not there is a documented policy
that addresses the way clients and volunteers are
treated or expected to behave in the pantry. So if there is a
documented policy in place, you’ll select yes. And if no, you’ll
skip to number 42. Next slide. So 41. So if you answered
yes for number 40, this question asks
whether or not the policy is
displayed somewhere that clients and volunteers
within the pantry can see it. So here is an example in
this picture of a respect and dignity policy
that was displayed in a pantry we visited. It was displayed on a wall
where clients go to check in. Next slide. 42– is food safety training
a documented requirement for staff or volunteers who
have leadership positions? So staff in this question
would be considered paid pantry employees. And that can include AmeriCorps
volunteers or other service corps volunteers that get
a stipend for their work at the pantry. And volunteers with
leadership positions would be those who
manage other volunteers or who have other
leadership responsibilities. So if food safety training
is a documented requirement for people in either of those
roles, you’d select yes. Then, number 43 asks
whether food safety training is a documented
requirement for volunteers who do not have leadership
positions within the pantry. So those that maybe
don’t volunteer on a regular basis or they
don’t have any leadership responsibilities within
the pantry, that’s what this question is referring to. So this is an example. The agency has a written
policy that volunteers who will be repacking food
must read through a food safety pamphlet on proper
food handling. And if you could please
type what the yes or no, what the answer would be to
this question in this scenario. OK. Good. There’s a response. So yes, the answer in this
scenario would be yes. Because there is a
written policy about food safety for volunteers. Good. OK. Are there any questions
for section C so far? And I know time is winding down,
so in the interests of time, feel free to send in your
questions in the chat box or unmute yourself. If I see something, I’ll
stop and address it. But I’ll go on ahead
and get into section D, which is on food safety– frozen, chilled,
and dry storage. So D.1, which is on page
9, focuses on storage. So 44– does the pantry have
frozen storage available for foods? So this question is the
same question as number 26. But this time, it
does get scored. So if the answer to number 26
was no, this will also be no. And if you select no here,
you’ll skip to question 47. 45– if yes, please
record the temperature. If the pantry has multiple
frozen storage units, you’ll record the
temperature of the unit that has the most food in it. And we’re asking
about frozen storage and refrigerated
storage later on. Because having
chilled storage can increase the amount of fruit
and vegetables and main protein that the pantry is able
to offer to clients. And we’re asking about the
temperature, obviously, for food safety purposes,
for making sure the foods are stored properly. So 46– please select the
following types of freezers that the pantry has
available for food storage. Include off-site units and
list the number of units. Choose all that apply. So 45 and 46 are not scored. And for 46, on frozen
storage, you’ll check each unit type that
the pantry is available. And in the column to the right– which is in the tool, it’s
not shown in this slide– but in that column, you’ll
write how many of those units the pantry has. And again, like the
question states, you’ll include units
that are off-site. So those might be ones
that maybe another agency lets the pantry use. So the frozen
storage units can be spaces where food is
stored before it’s given out to clients– just any frozen unit
available to the pantry where they are
able to store food. So the list here includes
some of the main types of freezers we’ve encountered. And if there is
another type of freezer at the pantry that’s
not listed here, you would check “other freezer.” Please specify, which is
at the end of the list. And you would describe that
unit in the space provided. And if the pantry has a freezer
with three or more doors, you’d check the multidoor option
and list the number of doors that it has. If there’s a
freezer/refrigerator combination unit, like a
household freezer/fridge combo, you’ll include it in
this question only. You won’t count it
again in question 49 on refrigerator storage. And next slide, please. And here’s a couple
examples of household-style freezer/refrigerator combos. So these are the ones that
will be counted in question 46. And on the left here is a
single-door household cooler. And on the right is a
single-door commercial reach-in cooler. And the two pictures
on the top here show large walk-in
commercial coolers. On the lower left,
there are examples of double-door commercial
reach-in coolers with displays. And the lower right has some
of the multidoor commercial and display reach-in coolers. So if the pantry has one of
these on the lower right, you will record the number
of doors that it has. OK. So these are just like
question 44 and 45, but they’re asking
about refrigerators instead of freezers. So 47– does the pantry have
refrigerated chilled storage available for foods? If no is selected,
skip to number 50. If yes, please record
the temperature. Again, if there are
multiple chilled storages or refrigerators,
then you’ll record the temperature of the unit
that has the most food. Next slide. OK. And you’ll complete
this question just like you did for 46,
except for refrigerators. And there were some examples
in the previous slides that you can refer to. They’re also in the
instruction guide if you have a hard time
classifying which unit you’re seeing at the pantry. All right. And 50– what is the
approximate square footage of all dry storage space
available to the pantry? This question is not scored. So just estimate this
as best as you can– length times width. And also include any
off-site storage space. So if the pantry has, maybe,
a neighbor or a partner agency where they can store dry goods,
you can include those, as well. For partner agency raters
who are completing this, you can ask a pantry
representative to estimate the square footage. And we’re asking
this because we just want to get an idea of the
size and overall capacity of the pantry. Because the dry storage is
often the largest storage space in the pantry. 51– please describe
dry storage space. Whoop. Sorry. So this question is not scored. And just a brief description
of the dry storage spaces. Because in pantries, these
tend to vary so much. So there are some
examples listed there. You can include if it’s indoors
or outdoors, humidity control, if it has five aisles of
floor-to-ceiling shelving or if it just has one
seven-foot shelf, et cetera. Next slide, please. OK. Now, D.2 is on page 10, and
it focuses on food safety. So 52– is there a
thermometer or thermostat in the dry storage area? Again, dry storage
is usually going to be the largest
portion of the pantry. So you’ll select no if there is
no thermometer or thermostat, or if there is one, but it’s
broken, you’ll select no. And then you will
skip to number 54. If yes, if there is a
functioning thermometer or thermostat in the dry
storage area, you’ll select yes. Number 53– record the
temperature of the thermometer or thermostat in dry storage and
select the appropriate score. So record the temperature
there, and then, if it’s between 43 and
83 degrees Fahrenheit, you’ll select one. If it’s not, you’ll do zero. 54– are hand washing signs
displayed above sinks? So hand washing is,
obviously, really important for food safety
reasons and preventing food-borne illnesses. So this question is
asking whether signs are displayed where people in
the pantry wash their hands. And the signs can either
illustrate proper hand washing procedure or be
reminders for volunteers and staff to wash their hands. So the rater would identify
where staff and volunteers go to wash their hands and
see whether there are hand washing signs displayed. So if none of the sinks
have hand washing signs, you’ll select zero. If all of them have
signs, select two. And if some sinks have
hand washing signs but not all of them,
you’ll select one. Next slide. And 55– how clean and
clear is the area where food is brought into the pantry? Observe the area where
food is brought in. So this is also called
the food receiving area. It’s usually in the back of the
building or by an exit door. And this is probably not where
food is given out to clients. So here are some example images
to represent each scoring option. Basically, to
assess clutter, see whether a volunteer or
anybody bringing in donations might trip over anything. For assessing dirty
versus clean, imagine if you were to drop a piece of
fruit on the floor on your way in, would it get filthy? Is there visible dirt
and grime on the floor? So if there are things
that somebody can trip over and there’s visible dirt
and grime on the floor, select dirty and
cluttered, or zero. If the floor looks
clean, but there are things people
could trip over, you’ll select clean
but cluttered, or one. And if the area is clean
and free of obstacles, you’ll select clean
and clear, or two. So 56– what kind of
transportation equipment is available for
use by the pantry? Ask the food pantry
manager or representative what transportation the pantry
uses to collect or distribute food. So only private
transportation, or zero. Shared vehicle or food bank
distributor vehicle is one. And pantry- or agency-owned
vehicle and use is two. Excuse me. So if there’s no
designated vehicle that the pantry uses for
food, or if the only vehicle or vehicles that they use are
somebody’s personal vehicle– so if, maybe, a volunteer
lends the pantry their truck once a week– you would select zero. And if there’s at least
one vehicle that’s not privately owned that
the pantry uses for food, but it is shared
with another agency– so between a pantry and another
pantry, or the food bank might let the pantry
use the vehicle– that would be a one. And if there’s at
least one vehicle that’s insured and owned by the
pantry, then you’ll select two. OK. Any questions on section D? Again, we’re– we’ve got,
let’s see, 12 minutes left. So I’ll just keep moving along. And I’ll answer anything
that comes up as I see it. So section E is
on other services that the pantry offers. There are only three yes or
no questions in this section. So we’ll move through
this pretty quickly here. Next slide, please. So 57– does the pantry provide
or partner with another agency to deliver nutrition
education classes on-site? So this question is specifically
asking about formal classes on nutrition that are
offered on-site at the pantry and in an area that’s
designated for classes. So this would not include
demonstrations or classes that are delivered
where clients are in the process of picking up
their food or waiting in line or checking in. This is just, specifically,
nutrition classes that are held in a
designated area for classes. So the nutrition
education classes can include cooking
components, and they often do, but these would be separate
from classes that are just strictly cooking lessons. They need to have a
nutrition component, or nutrition should be
the focus of the classes. So you would not include
cooking lessons or food demos. Those would be in
the next question. All right. Next slide, please. 58– does the pantry
host food demonstrations, provide samples, or
distribute recipes to clients? So those three things are all
lumped into this question here. So food demonstrations, those
can be by volunteers or staff or partners– anything demonstrating how to
prepare or cook with foods that are available at the pantry. And samples include
samples of food at the pantry that don’t count
as part of the client’s food allotment. And they would ideally not
be cupcakes or donuts donated from a bakery or something. It would be on the healthy side. So the recipes can
be in any form. Those can be pamphlets or
cookbooks, index cards, or handouts– anything like that that’s
available to clients for free. Next slide, please. So 59– does the pantry have
visual or spoken referrals to WIC, TANF, SNAP, et cetera? So these can be physical,
visual referrals like these, or spoken. So these can include
any system in place where clients are verbally
referred to these programs. All right Next slide. OK. And that is it. I see a question on 56. If you own a vehicle but
have some private vehicles used, as well. So if there is at least
one of those vehicles– so it looks like one that is– let me see. Thank you, Alexandra. So if the one vehicle
is owned and insured in the name of the food
pantry or food bank agency, then that would be
a two, I believe. Alexandra, would you agree? ALEXANDRA BUSH-KAUFMAN:
That’s how I would score it. Because this is just moving
towards the best practice. And it can be a challenge
to get a pantry- or a food bank-owned vehicle that’s
licensed and insured for the specific agency. It’s a capacity and
a funding question. And so I think once you’ve
achieved that ownership that you’ve reached
the best practice. And then, I think that the
sign that you are using more volunteers’ vehicles to pick up
produce is probably a sign that your capacity is growing. And that’s really
great in that you’re moving on to the next step. But I would say that that’s
beyond this assessment. So if you do have an
agency-owned vehicle that’s dedicated for your location and
your agency holds the insurance for it, that’s a two. If it’s an agency-owned
vehicle, but it’s shared between
multiple locations, then you would select a one. Again, this question
is really getting at, do you have the
equipment that you need to pick up as much
fresh foods as possible to have the highest amount
of variety and quality to be able to offer
to your clients? And if the answer is yes,
then you’re at that two. And that’s what this
question is trying to get at. So I’m going to go ahead and
jump into other supplementary programs. And these are unscored questions
at the end of the assessment. We’re not going to go
through each one of them because we know that they look
different at each food pantry, at each food bank agency. And information
on these programs, and referrals to
other information, is included in our
resource guide. And when we did our
interviews and our research into what agencies are
doing to make their foods and their services
healthier, these were some of the things
that were going on. But it wasn’t
across the spectrum. And these supplementary
programs are really dependent upon the
capacity of the agency, which includes how many volunteers
or staff, how much funding is coming in,
sometimes even what the governmental or regulatory
requirements are in your state or region, and also the need
that is in your community and what you’re doing there. So these are yes/no
questions, really, to assess do you have
these programs in place? Do you need to have
these programs in place? And they’re not essential to the
final score of the assessment. And then, our last question–
what comments would you like to share about your
food pantry environment? Please use the space below. This question is not scored. So when we did our pilot
and our field test and in using the survey,
people told us that they wanted
a space to include additional details
and information that informed their
choice selections on the rest of the survey. So this would be
the space where you might describe the issue
with transportation that was described. Well, we have a vehicle that we
own and hold the insurance for. But we also have
private vehicles in use, as well, because we’ve
got so many donations that we need to pick up. And so this space, while
it is a little bit smaller on the survey itself,
provides you with space to add a little bit more
richness to the assessment. And you might even
use this space to write down what you want
your goals for moving forward, when you do a follow-up
assessment, what you might be interested in accomplishing. So that’s really brief. I’m going to go
ahead and open up the presentation
for all questions, maybe, that you have unanswered. And I would like
to say thank you for going through this
presentation with us. I’m going to keep the recording
going for about another minute just to keep
the floor open, unless there’s a
question that comes up. And then, I’ll definitely
respond to that. Please take down our
contact information. And we’d love to have a dialogue
or provide additional details about this survey or
about the project. You can find information about
this project on our website. And it’s
[? wrnece.colostate.edu. ?] And then you navigate
to [INAUDIBLE] Projects to Healthy Food Pantry
Assessment Project. And that’ll give you some
more background there. And then, you can also find
the files to download yourself. Yeah. So I hear somebody
who’s been unmuted. Question? AUDIENCE: Yeah. I was just wondering,
as you guys have been doing this survey, what’s
the average percent that you’ve been getting from the different
sites that you’ve surveyed? ALEXANDRA BUSH-KAUFMAN: When you
say outreach, what do you mean, I guess? AUDIENCE: The average percent. You’ve used this
survey and whatnot, what are most of the
pantries or sites– what kind of scores are
they coming up with? ALEXANDRA BUSH-KAUFMAN:
OK, average– average. Yeah, so the overall scores– it kind of depends on what
region or the ruralness or the urbanness
of the pantries. And generally,
more rural pantries have a little bit
more challenges with getting the fresh and
frozen fruits and vegetables or protein. Because the foods
available to clients is where most of
the points are, that can take away the points because
it’s a challenge sourcing those into the rural areas. So that changes the score. And then, the size and,
also, the age of the agency. So if it’s a relatively new
pantry that’s very small, they are usually going to score
somewhere between 35 and 55 in points. And if it’s a medium
size or a larger agency and it’s been around
for more time– maybe 10, 20 years– it could start off at 50,
and it could go up to 70. The highest scoring
pantries that we had at the beginning of
our field test in November were in the 70s. And then, they did their
follow-up assessment in April, they were in the 80s. And in our results,
it wasn’t actually that their food
changed in section B, but they addressed some of
the accessibility issues and location and entrance. They worked with their
local city councils to get a crosswalk sign placed
outside of their food bank because [AUDIO OUT]
traveling really fast, and they didn’t feel safe
with the speed of cars. And then, they also changed from
requiring multiple documents to get services, they changed
to a self-declared model. Because they had
enough food available. And they just said,
well, we’re just going to let people come in
and say if they need food, then we’re just going
to give them food. And so it was those
kinds of changes that really pushed people that
already scored in the 70s that pushed them up into the 80s. I hope that provides an
answer for your question. If you’re familiar with some of
these types of interventions, or if there were
some pictures that might have been taken at
your food pantry agency– because those pictures
represent some of the environmental support
interventions that happened in Pierce County, Washington– it’s very likely that
your food bank is probably going to score in the 70s– 60s to 70s, maybe 80s. And it’s a little bit
harder, once you’re at that high of a score,
to continue moving up. But it is possible. And it usually involves looking
at other functions or things outside of just
looking at the food. AUDIENCE: I scored a 76. Because I was filling
it out as we went. So I just wanted to know where
I was at on the benchmarks. ALEXANDRA BUSH-KAUFMAN:
That would be pretty high. OK. So I’m going to go ahead
and end the recording. Thank you for viewing
this presentation. And I will go ahead–

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