Cooking With Countertop Appliances | Consumer Reports

Cooking With Countertop Appliances | Consumer Reports


[SNAP] All right, I think it’s time
to put all these ingredients in the oven. [PHONE RINGING] Building manager? Hello, it’s Jack. Hi. Wait, you’re
turning off the gas? Today? Hold on a second, I have friends
coming over for dinner tonight! Hey, Jack. Oh hey, Sara. Thanks a lot for coming
over to help me prep. I’ve got some terrible news. What is it? The building manager
called and said he was turning off the gas. How am I going to cook all
of this food without an oven? You know what? I’m going to order Chinese. Jack, you don’t have to do that. I see you have a toaster oven. A lot of the food that you
want to cook in your oven you can also make
in the toaster oven. Really? And I bet you have
some other countertop appliances laying around. Well, you know, there’s
a couple of things I have not used, like this
thing I got for Christmas. All right, that’s an air fryer. Anything else? Yeah, there’s something
in the cabinet. This thing looks like a robot. That is a multi cooker. Oh. So between your multi
cooker, your air fryer, and your toaster
oven, look, we can make everything you want
to cook for dinner tonight. I put that right there. OK, Sarah. So where do I even begin? So your multi
cooker, first of all, this is really like an
all in one appliance. You can make a lot of dishes
in here from start to finish, and it doesn’t always
take as much time. Multi cookers are just one of
the many countertop appliances that we test at
Consumer Reports. We test their ability to saute,
steam, slow cook and pressure cook, and how well
they make rice. So your deviled egg appetizer,
since we can’t boil water on the stove, we’re going to
pressure cook your eggs in here in about a cup of
water for 10 minutes. They’ll be ready to go
to make deviled eggs. I had no idea that
that could do that. That’s right. All right, now let’s move
on to the toaster oven. OK. This is where we’ll bake
the cobbler for dessert. Hey, hold on a second. Are you sure? Because this is my mama’s
favorite blueberry mango cobbler. Absolutely. The toaster oven can handle it. Trust me. We’re also going to
make the kale chips that you want to put together
for an appetizer in the toaster oven. Oh, nice. OK. Toaster ovens are handy,
because they heat up faster than traditional
ovens and they’re great for baking smaller items. To test them, we make
toast, cookies, muffins, and even reheat lasagna. So Jack, now let’s move
on to the air fryer. I thought this just cooked
French fries and chicken wings. No, you can actually
use an air fryer. We’re going to use it
to roast your salmon and cook all the
vegetables for dinner. This is sort of like a
countertop convection oven. So it uses hot air inside with
fans circulating the hot air, to really crisp
up all this food. That’s pretty cool. We find that
there’s a difference in the size of the
basket, so thankfully you have one that will
hold a lot of food. Sara, I had no idea that
these three appliances could replace my stove. Let’s get to work. You save the day, Sara. So how does a machine like
this generate enough heat to cook all this food? Jack, that’s a great question. And I have just the
person to answer it. Don’t tell me. James Dickerson, chief
scientific officer. Take it away, James! Hi, Jack. I’m glad you asked. There are three
ways that heat is transferred, through convection,
and conduction, and radiation. Convection is the
transfer of heat through the motion of fluids,
like liquids and gases. Think of air flowing
out of a hairdryer. A traditional oven
generally emanates heat from an element in
the base of the oven. You might have to wait a
while for the oven to heat up. A convection oven has a fan
that circulates the hot air around the cavity,
which causes food to more evenly and quickly. Ditto for that air fryer
that you have there. It’s simply a convection cooker
that sits on the countertop. Conduction is the
transfer of heat typically through
solid to solid contact. A good example is a frying
pan set on a stove top. Heat conducts from
the bottom of the pan to the food within the bowl. A multi cooker has a
small heating element on the bottom that conducts
heat and transfers it to the metal liner of the
cooker to cook the food. Finally, heat can be
transferred through radiation. Radiation involves
the transfer of heat through the emission
of infrared light that emanates from a hot object. Think of placing your hand
near an incandescent light bulb or over a hot stove top. Now, conventional toaster
ovens have built in coils in the top and the
bottom that heat up, radiating heat throughout it
so that it can broil, bake, or even toast your food. Carry on. Thanks for the information. All right, Jack, our
eggs look awesome. I’m going to start
tracking them. And these corn on the
cob look nice and brown. They’re here! What a lovely spread definitely. You guys must have worked
all day over a hot stove. Actually, we had a little help
from some cool appliances. Bon appetit, everybody. Enjoy Nice, Jack. Thank you, Jack. You’re welcome. Cheers. [SNAP]

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